Dr Emlyn Dodd

Contact details

Name:
Dr Emlyn Dodd
Qualifications:
B.AncHist (Hons I), PhD
Position:
Lecturer in Classical Studies
Institute:
Institute of Classical Studies
Email address:
emlyn.dodd@sas.ac.uk
Website:
https://ics.sas.ac.uk/people/dr-emlyn-dodd

Research Summary and Profile

Research interests:
Ancient History, Archaeology, Classics
Research keywords:
Roman archaeology, urban development, ancient agriculture, ancient wine, viticulture, olive oil, landscape archaeology, Mediterranean, Italy, Greece, Türkiye, island studies
Regions:
Africa, Europe, Middle East
Summary of research interests and expertise:

Emlyn Dodd is Lecturer in Classical Studies at the ICS, and was Assistant Director for Archaeology at the British School at Rome from 2021–23. He is a Greek and Roman archaeologist specialising in the study of ancient wine and oil, along with agriculture, technology and trade more broadly. He is also interested in ancient non-elites seen through the archaeology of Roman urban and rural sites. He has published extensively on the production of wine and oil in antiquity, including the books Roman and Late Antique Wine Production in the Eastern Mediterranean (2020) and Methods in Ancient Wine Archaeology (Bloomsbury, 2024) as well as recent articles in the American Journal of Archaeology and Antiquity. He has also appeared across radio and tv, including with National Geographic and the BBC, writes regularly for public-facing media, including several articles in The Conversation, and has featured in international media, including The Guardian, NBC News and The Washington Post.

Emlyn co-directs the Falerii Novi Project, including large-scale excavations at this Roman city in central Italy. He also directs a survey project in the Cyclades, investigating the production of wine and oil, with a focus on the identification and distribution of agricultural technology and knowledge in the Classical to Late Antique eras. He is an active collaborator with the Antiochia ad Cragum Archaeological Research Project (Gazipasa, Turkey) and has previously worked at Delos, the Athenian Agora and Acropolis (Greece); Pompeii, Oplontis, Carsulae and in Sicily (Italy).

Emlyn was named Macquarie University's Early Career Researcher of the Year in 2023. He is Research Fellow at the British School at Rome, Research Affiliate at the Australian Archaeological Institute in Athens, an Honorary Fellow at Macquarie University (Sydney, Australia) and Elected Fellow of the Royal Historical Society and Society of Antiquaries London. He has won competitive funding and awards from the British Academy, Leverhulme Foundation, Australian Academy of the Humanities, British School at Athens, Museum of Cycladic Art, and the Australasian Society for Classical Studies among others. He is also a passionate student equity advocate, practitioner and researcher and has worked closely with widening participation and equity programs at the University of Technology Sydney and Western Sydney University.

Languages:
Spoken Written
Italian Intermediate Intermediate
Publication Details

Related publications/articles:

Date Details
08-Feb-2024 Methods in Ancient Wine Archaeology: Scientific Approaches in Roman Contexts

Edited Book

Dodd, E. and D. Van Limbergen (eds). 2024. Methods in Ancient Wine Archaeology: Scientific Approaches in Roman Contexts (London: Bloomsbury). ISBN: 9781350346642

Bringing together a wide array of modern scientific techniques and interdisciplinary approaches, this book provides an accessible guide to the methods that form the current bedrock of research into Roman, and more broadly ancient, wine. Chapters are arranged into thematic sections, covering biomolecular archaeology and chemical analysis, archaeobotany and palynology, vineyard and landscape archaeology and computational and experimental archaeology. These include discussions of some of the most recent techniques, such as ancient DNA and organic residue analyses, geophysical prospection, multispectral imaging and spatial and climatic modelling. While most of the content is of direct relevance to the Roman Mediterranean, the assortment of detailed case studies, methodological outlines and broader 'state of the field' reflections is of equal use to researchers working across disparate disciplines, geographies, and chronologies.

08-Feb-2024 Scientific approaches to ancient wine: developments, challenges, and future perspectives

Chapters

Dodd, E. and D. Van Limbergen. 2024. 'Scientific approaches to ancient wine: developments, challenges, and future perspectives.' In E. Dodd and D. Van Limbergen (eds), Methods in Ancient Wine Archaeology: Scientific Approaches in Roman Contexts (London: Bloomsbury): 1–12. doi: 10.5040/9781350346680.ch-001

09-Jan-2024 Ancient olive presses and oil production in Cyrenaica (North-East Libya)

Review

Dodd, E. 2024. 'Review of A. Buzaian, Ancient olive presses and oil production in Cyrenaica (North-East Libya). London: British Institute for Libyan and Northern African Studies, 2022. Pp. 176. ISBN 9781915808004.' Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2024.01.03.

01-Dec-2023 Wine and the vine in ancient Italy: an archaeological approach

Chapters

Dodd, E. 2023. ‘Wine and the vine in ancient Italy: an archaeological approach.’ In Situating foodways and foodscapes: dalla tavola al terreno, R. Cevasco, V. Pescini and R. Hearn (eds). Genoa, Genoa University Press: 71–105.

01-Jul-2023 The Falerii Novi Project

Articles

Andrews, M., Bernard, S., Dodd, E., Fochetti, B., Kay, S., Liverani, P., Millett, M. and Vermeulen, F. (2023). ‘The Falerii Novi Project.’ Papers of the British School at Rome 91.

The Falerii Novi Project represents a newly formed archaeological initiative to explore the Roman city of Falerii Novi. The project forms a collaboration of the British School at Rome with a multinational team of partner institutions. Thanks to a rich legacy of geophysical work on both the site and its territory, Falerii Novi presents an exceptional opportunity to advance understanding of urbanism in ancient and medieval Italy. The Falerii Novi Project employs a range of methodologies, integrating continued site-scale survey with new campaigns of stratigraphic excavation, archival research and environmental archaeology. The project aims to present a more expansive and holistic urban history of this key Tiber Valley settlement by focusing on long-run socio-economic processes both within Falerii Novi and as they linked the city to its wider landscape.

Il Falerii Novi Project rappresenta un'iniziativa archeologica di recente formazione per indagare la città romana di Falerii Novi. Il progetto nasce dalla collaborazione della British School at Rome con un team internazionale di istituzioni partner. Grazie a una ricca ‘eredità’ di lavori geofisici sia sul sito che sul suo territorio, Falerii Novi rappresenta un'opportunità eccezionale per favorire l'avanzamento della comprensione del fenomeno urbano nell'Italia antica e medievale. Il Falerii Novi Project impiega un'ampia gamma di metodologie, integrando la prosecuzione dei rilievi ad una scala di sito con nuove campagne di scavo stratigrafico, ricerca d'archivio e archeologia ambientale. Il progetto mira a presentare una storia urbana più ampia e olistica di questo insediamento chiave della Valle del Tevere, concentrandosi sui processi socioeconomici di lungo periodo sia all'interno di Falerii Novi sia tra la città e il suo più ampio ambito territoriale.

18-Apr-2023 The spectacle of production: a Roman imperial winery at the Villa of the Quintilii, Rome

Articles

Dodd, E., Galli, G. and Frontoni, R. (2023). ‘The spectacle of production: a Roman imperial winery at the Villa of the Quintilii, Rome.’ Antiquity 97.392: 436–453.

The elites of many past cultures have sought to romanticise agricultural labour—often the source of their wealth and hence their status. A recently discovered winery at the Villa of the Quintilii on the Via Appia Antica, near Rome, provides only the second known example from the Graeco-Roman world of an opulent wine production complex built to facilitate vinicultural ‘spectacle’. The authors present the architectural and decorative form of the winery and illustrate how the annual vintage was reimagined as ‘theatrical’ performance. Dating to the mid third century AD, the complex illuminates how ancient elites could fuse utilitarian function with ostentatious luxury to fashion their social and political status.

01-Apr-2023 Making the invisible, visible: a twenty-first century approach to tertiary preparation, attainment and access for student equity

Articles

Dodd, E., Ellis, S., and Singh, S. (2023). ‘Making the invisible, visible: a twenty-first century approach to tertiary preparation, attainment and access for student equity.’ International Journal of Inclusive Education 27.2: 167–87 (Published online in 2020).

The U@Uni Academy provides a case study of a composite preparation and access programme, integrating key elements of widening participation, alternate entry and enabling schemes. It is offered to students from a low socioeconomic background andfocuses on non-traditional indicators of attainment in order to prepare for, access and successfully transition from secondary school to higher education. This article outlines the methodological and theoretical approach, purpose, and context surrounding the programme, as well as its significancewithin the contemporary Australian and international education systems. The strengthening momentum of alternate entry and enabling schemes within the context of equity and diversity in higher education is illuminated, highlighting the need for innovative approaches in this sector. Such a perspective invites the international education community to reframe how they approach attainment, admissions and success, shifting from a traditional focus on high-stakes, single-mark assessment, to a rich, layered and contextualised representation of a student’s skills and, through this, revealing the often invisible potential of a student. This is timely within the global context of future-focused tertiary education and debate surrounding admissions processes across the Australian higher education sector. Its significance is underscored by potential to influence the landscape of university admissions on a broader scale.

01-Oct-2022 Wine, oil, and knowledge networks across the Graeco-Roman Cyclades (Greece)

Articles

Dodd, E. (2022). ‘Wine, oil, and knowledge networks across the Graeco-Roman Cyclades (Greece).’ Papers of the British School at Rome 90: 352–355.

01-Oct-2022 The Falerii Novi Project: the 2021 season

Articles

Bernard, S., Andrews, M., Ceccarelli, L., Dodd, E., Kay, S., Leone, N. and Vermeulen, F. (2022). ‘The Falerii Novi Project: the 2021 season.’ Papers of the British School at Rome 90: 341–345.

17-Aug-2022 Wine, oil, and knowledge networks across the Graeco-Roman Cyclades: new data from Paros and Naxos in 2021

Articles

Dodd, E. (2022). ‘Wine, oil, and knowledge networks across the Graeco-Roman Cyclades: new data from Paros and Naxos in 2021.’ Mediterranean Archaeology 34/35: 155–167.

This article provides a catalogue and discussion of material from surveys undertaken in 2021 across Paros and Naxos as part of the ‘Wine, oil, and knowledge networks in the ancient Cyclades’ project. A range of new data was recorded, most of which supports previous work regarding (micro)regional press type preference and production habits on Cycladic islands from the Hellenistic to Late Antique eras. In particular, the Cheimarrou tower site and Kastro Apalirou (Naxos) provide insight into two different modes of agricultural productivity and contribute comparative data to previously recorded material from Delos, Paros, Amorgos, Antiparos, Tinos, and Mykonos. Recurrent problems within this field, including the inability to effectively date and discern between the production of wine or oil, remain consistent.

01-Jul-2022 The archaeology of wine production in Roman and pre-Roman Italy

Articles

Dodd, E. (2022). ‘The archaeology of wine production in Roman and pre-Roman Italy.’ American Journal of Archaeology 126.3: 443–480.

The world of vinicultural archaeology has expanded exponentially over the past two decades, adding novel discoveries, methodologies, theories, and new archaeological evidence. Despite this, focused regional or site-specific approaches and syntheses dominate scholarship. This article provides an alternate, macroperspective via a comprehensive update and overview of the archaeological evidence for the entire Italian peninsula. When considered as a whole, the sheer quantity of evidence is simply a starting point for future research directions. New data from pre-Roman Italy might suggest localized indigenous winemaking experimentation, contrasting with traditionally dominant east–west colonial diffusionist models. Detailed cataloguing and interpretation of Roman wineries demonstrate that two dominant press types were present simultaneously. Along with these syntheses, previously unpublished evidence is analyzed for the first time, including conspicuous, lavish, and theatrical wine production at the Villa dei Quintili just outside Rome.

02-Nov-2021 Equalizing and widening access to higher education during a pandemic: lessons learned from a multi-university perspective

Articles

Dodd, E., Singh, S., Micsko, J., Adams, K., Morison, C. and Upton, S. (2021). ‘Equalizing and widening access to higher education during a pandemic: lessons learned from a multi-university perspective.’ Student Success 12.3: 58–72.

The COVID-19 pandemic caused a rapid and unprecedented shift of widening participation and outreach activities to online and remote delivery. The impact of this went beyond practitioners and the university sector; positive and negative implications are felt by stakeholders and the broader community. This shift online is discussed through the lens of a multi-university perspective, using four case studies from university outreach programs in one Australian state. The article provides a holistic view of the lessons learned and discoveries made, informing future program design and delivery. These programs include primary and secondary students, teachers, parents, guardians and carers, and work within a range of low socioeconomic and regional, rural and remote contexts. We argue that the fundamentally necessary shift online created a profound legacy and bears potential to increase accessibility (via diversity and scale), but, simultaneously, that care must be applied if substituting face-to-face engagement with that online. While this article primarily focuses on issues of value to practitioners, it also discusses important implications for academics, support staff, and university executive regarding the access and participation of underrepresented cohorts during times of mass change.

05-Oct-2020 Late Roman viticulture in Rough Cilicia: an unusual wine press at Antiochia ad Cragum

Articles

Dodd, E. (2020). ‘Late Roman viticulture in Rough Cilicia: an unusual wine press at Antiochia ad Cragum.’ Journal of Roman Archaeology 33: 467–482.

This paper was born from the discovery and excavation of a Late Roman wine press at the site of Antiochia ad Cragum. While many studies exist in the field of ancient viticulture, much fewer are published that discuss Rough Cilician wine production. The paper, therefore, first seeks to document and summarise a range of existing scholarship on viticulture in Rough Cilicia, assembling this in one critical apparatus for future research; this also provides a useful framework against which to assess the recent discovery at Antiochia ad Cragum. Following this, a report and investigation of the recently discovered press is included to illustrate the importance and potential detailed analyses on individual press sites provide. Notably, this installation possesses the first excavated vinicultural vat in Rough Cilicia and a ‘built’ architectural form that differs from the multitude of known rock-cut wine and olive installations in this region.

19-Aug-2020 Population decline and viticultural industry: societal transformation on Late Antique Delos (Greece)

Chapters

Dodd, E. (2020). ‘Population decline and viticultural industry: societal transformation on Late Antique Delos (Greece).’ In The Resilience of the Roman Empire: regional case studies on the relationship between population and food resources, D. Van Limbergen, S. Maréchal and W. De Clercq (eds). Oxford, BAR: 109–128.

The island of Delos had a lengthy settlement history and was of great importance throughout antiquity; intermittently, it was a major religious, commercial and political centre within the Mediterranean. These periods of prosperity and growth (namely, the Hellenistic and early Roman eras) were the focus of increasingly interdisciplinary Delian studies for over two centuries; until recently, little research was completed regarding the later history and archaeology of Delos. Studies over the past 20 years confirm that Delos did experience contraction and deterioration after its Hellenistic peak, but, almost certainly, not to the extent once thought. The investigations of the present author affirm that a sizeable, albeit reduced, population remained on Delos even into Late Antiquity linked directly to a prosperous, contemporary wine industry. This illustrates the resilience and persistence of the post-Hellenistic population and elucidates the potential fate of such islands in antiquity, where, rather than collapse, they underwent some form of societal transformation more difficult to recognise through the archaeological record. Reasons for such a sequence of events are explored, linked to the discussions of Horden, Purcell, Bevan and Conolly, centred around theories of island interconnectivity and the formation of specialised, agriculturally productive niches. With these considerations in mind, Delos presents an exceptional case study to observe an influential and significant ancient city that underwent extreme change – Hellenistic prosperity to Late Antique ‘decline’ – but maintained notable features often associated with cities of higher-level population and prosperity.

12-Aug-2020 Wine and olive oil across the ancient Cyclades: a preliminary report and new thoughts on the development of Greek and Roman press technology

Articles

Dodd, E. (2020). ‘Wine and olive oil across the ancient Cyclades: a preliminary report and new thoughts on the development of Greek and Roman press technology.’ Mediterranean Archaeology 32/33 (2019/2020): 123–138.

This paper presents the results of 2019-2020 fieldwork across five Cycladic islands, as part of the "Wine and Oil in the Graeco-Roman Cyclades" project. For the first time, a range of material relevant to the production of oil and wine in antiquity (including press beds, counterweights and vats) was systematically documented and analysed across Paros, Antiparos, Amorgos, Tinos, and Mykonos. Discussion reveals relationships to Hellenistic tower structures, interconnectivity with kiln and port areas and productive landscapes. Dates and typologies are tentatively proposed in line with existing studies by the author as well as reflection upon the insular yet extroverted identities of such islands.

01-Jan-2020 Roman and Late Antique Wine Production in the Eastern Mediterranean: A Comparative Archaeological Study at Antiochia ad Cragum (Turkey) and Delos (Greece)

Monographs

Dodd, E. (2020). Roman and Late Antique wine production in the eastern Mediterranean. Oxford, Archaeopress.

Wine was an ever-present commodity that permeated the Mediterranean throughout antiquity. This book analyses the viticulture of two settlements, Antiochia ad Cragum and Delos, using results stemming from surface survey and excavation to assess their potential integration within the now well-known agricultural boom of the 5th-7th centuries AD. Roman and Late Antique Wine Production in the Eastern Mediterranean is devoted to the viticulture of two settlements, Antiochia ad Cragum and Delos, using results stemming from surface survey and excavation to assess their potential integration within the now well-known agricultural boom of the 5th-7th centuries AD. Interdisciplinary and ethnographic data supplements the main archaeological catalogue and provides a rounded understanding of production and use. The publication of an excavated vinicultural vat in Rough Cilicia for the first time, along with the first complete discussion of the viticultural industry on Delos in Late Antiquity, underscores the significance of this book. The combined catalogue, analysis and discussion reinforce the noteworthy position viticulture held in Late Antiquity as an agricultural endeavour, sociocultural and economic factor engrained within eastern Mediterranean settlements.

16-Aug-2017 Pressing issues: a new discovery in the vineyard of region I.20, Pompeii

Articles

Dodd, E. (2017). ‘Pressing issues: a new discovery in the vineyard of region I.20, Pompeii.’ Archeologia Classica 68: 577–588.

The discovery of an agricultural press counterweight, during an archaeological reassessment of Region I.20 at Pompeii, alters previous hypotheses regarding the viticultural function of this insula. Traditional interpretations of quality, quantity and method must be adjusted. Furthermore, the type of counterweight found, a Semana (T55121) or Brun type 11, has implications not only for this insula and Pompeii, but also for the wider Italian peninsular. It illustrates a different method of mechanical pressing to that commonly found in Campania and is the first of this type to be found in southern Italy, which supports the theorised Greek colonial distribution of this technology. This brief study illuminates the need and the benefit of such archaeological reassessments, particularly in relation to ancient agricultural features.

20-Sep-2016 Macquarie Gale Rome Scholarship: Roman viticulture and the provinces. An archaeological study on wine production and the socio-cultural connectivity it stimulates

Articles

Dodd, E. (2016). ‘Macquarie Gale Rome Scholarship: Roman viticulture and the provinces. An archaeological study on wine production and the socio-cultural connectivity it stimulates.’ Papers of the British School at Rome 84: 352–354.

13-Aug-2014 From Hispania to the Chalkidiki: a detailed study of transport amphorae from the Macquarie University Museum of Ancient Cultures

Articles

Dodd, E. (2014). ‘From Hispania to the Chalkidiki: a detailed study of transport amphorae from the Macquarie University Museum of Ancient Cultures.’ Chronika 4: 22–40.

This study considers a collection of four diverse amphorae recently acquired by the Macquarie University Museum of Ancient Cultures. Upon commencing, these ceramic vessels bore no information regarding distribution or contents and were largely unanalyzed and unpublished. This paper seeks to determine what they can reveal through a detailed study of their origins, provenance, principal contents, and potential distribution. It is hoped that this information will aid in the analysis of larger trade networks for these amphora types along with their role in the economies of the ancient Mediterranean.

Publications available on SAS-space:

Date Details
Apr-2023 The spectacle of production: a Roman imperial winery at the Villa of the Quintilii, Rome

PeerReviewed

The elites of many past cultures have sought to romanticise agricultural labour—often the source of their wealth and hence their status. A recently discovered winery at the Villa of the Quintilii on the Via Appia Antica, near Rome, provides only the second known example from the Graeco-Roman world of an opulent wine production complex built to facilitate vinicultural ‘spectacle’. The authors present the architectural and decorative form of the winery and illustrate how the annual vintage was reimagined as ‘theatrical’ performance. Dating to the mid third century AD, the complex illuminates how ancient elites could fuse utilitarian function with ostentatious luxury to fashion their social and political status.

The Falerii Novi Project

PeerReviewed

The Falerii Novi Project represents a newly formed archaeological initiative to explore the Roman city of Falerii Novi. The project forms a collaboration of the British School at Rome with a multinational team of partner institutions. Thanks to a rich legacy of geophysical work on both the site and its territory, Falerii Novi presents an exceptional opportunity to advance understanding of urbanism in ancient and medieval Italy. The Falerii Novi Project employs a range of methodologies, integrating continued site-scale survey with new campaigns of stratigraphic excavation, archival research and environmental archaeology. The project aims to present a more expansive and holistic urban history of this key Tiber Valley settlement by focusing on long-run socio-economic processes both within Falerii Novi and as they linked the city to its wider landscape.

Jul-2022 The archaeology of wine production in Roman and pre-Roman Italy

PeerReviewed

The world of vinicultural archaeology has expanded exponentially over the past two decades, adding novel discoveries, methodologies, theories, and new archaeological evidence. Despite this, focused regional or site-specific approaches and syntheses dominate scholarship. This article provides an alternate, macroperspective via a comprehensive update and overview of the archaeological evidence for the entire Italian peninsula. When considered as a whole, the sheer quantity of evidence is simply a starting point for future research directions. New data from pre-Roman Italy might suggest localized indigenous winemaking experimentation, contrasting with traditionally dominant east–west colonial diffusionist models. Detailed cataloguing and interpretation of Roman wineries demonstrate that two dominant press types were present simultaneously. Along with these syntheses, previously unpublished evidence is analyzed for the first time, including conspicuous, lavish, and theatrical wine production at the Villa dei Quintili just outside Rome.

Nov-2021 Equalizing and Widening Access to Higher Education During a Pandemic: Lessons Learned from a Multi-University Perspective

PeerReviewed

The COVID-19 pandemic caused a rapid and unprecedented shift of widening participation and outreach activities to online and remote delivery. The impact of this went beyond practitioners and the university sector; positive and negative implications are felt by stakeholders and the broader community. This shift online is discussed through the lens of a multi-university perspective, using four case studies from university outreach programs in one Australian state. The article provides a holistic view of the lessons learned and discoveries made, informing future program design and delivery. These programs include primary and secondary students, teachers, parents, guardians and carers, and work within a range of low socioeconomic and regional, rural and remote contexts. We argue that the fundamentally necessary shift online created a profound legacy and bears potential to increase accessibility (via diversity and scale), but, simultaneously, that care must be applied if substituting face-to-face engagement with that online. While this article primarily focuses on issues of value to practitioners, it also discusses important implications for academics, support staff, and university executive regarding the access and participation of underrepresented cohorts during times of mass change.

Dec-2023 Wine and the vine in ancient Italy: an archaeological approach

PeerReviewed

This chapter surveys and synthesises the latest evidence for winemaking and viticulture in ancient Italy, from the prehistoric era through Late Antiquity. It combines various forms of archaeological evidence, including art historical and scientific analysis, drawn from across the Italian peninsula to assess the role, scale and development of wine and the grapevine in social, cultural and economic terms.

Additional Publications

Research Projects & Supervisions

Research projects:

Details
Antiochia ad Cragum Archaeological Research Project (ACARP)

I serve as agricultural specialist in collaboration with the ACARP. The remains of Antiochia ad Cragum are located within the confines of the modern Turkish village of Güney, located approximately 12 kilometers SW of the town of Gazipasa in the district of Antalya on the south coast. The site is extensive, encompassing an area of approximately three hectares. There still stand substantial remains of baths, agricultural production facilities, a market, a colonnaded street with gateway, a large early Christian basilica, monumental tombs, and a temple, along with several unidentified structures. Antiochia is mentioned by several ancient sources as an important Roman commercial center and during the Byzantine era the city was a seat of a Christian bishopric. Under the direction of Prof. Michael Hoff and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, the Antiochia ad Cragum Archaeological Research Project (ACARP) has been conducting excavations at the site since 2004.

The Falerii Novi Project (FNP)

The Falerii Novi Project represents a newly formed archaeological initiative to explore the Roman city of Falerii Novi. The project forms a collaboration of the University of London, British School at Rome, Harvard University and University of Toronto. Thanks to a rich legacy of geophysical work on both the site and its territory, Falerii Novi presents an exceptional opportunity to advance understanding of urbanism in ancient and medieval Italy. The Falerii Novi Project employs a range of methodologies, integrating continued site-scale survey with new campaigns of stratigraphic excavation, archival research and environmental archaeology. The project aims to present a more expansive and holistic urban history of this key Tiber Valley settlement by focusing on long-run socio-economic processes both within Falerii Novi and as they linked the city to its wider landscape.

Wine, oil and knowledge networks across the ancient Cyclades

The project Wine, oil and knowledge networks of the Graeco-Roman Cyclades assesses the wine and oil production of Cycladic islands over a broad chronological period to determine where, how and with what these commodities were produced, by whom, and how this production fits into networks of agricultural knowledge, ceramic production, and the landscape (including harbours and transport infrastructure) of the Aegean and broader Mediterranean. It began in 2019 under the aegis of the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens and Greek Ministry of Culture and has now expanded into a larger multidiscipliary collaborative project with the British Schools at Rome and Athens. Since 2019, it has received funding from the Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens, Macquarie University (including the Centre for Ancient Cultural Heritage and Environment and Society for the Study of Early Christianity therein), the Australian Academy of the Humanities, British School at Athens, and the British Academy/Leverhulme Foundation.

Current PhD topics supervised:

Dates Details
From: 01-Oct-2023
Until:
Diachronic change in Rome's political spaces from the late Republican Age to early Principate: a GIS-based approach

Elizabeth Koch Koluk, Institute of Classical Studies, University of London (part time, distance)

Co-supervisor

From: 01-Jan-2024
Until:
The investigation of Roman urbanism in Italy through archaeological geophysical prospection

Stephen Kay, Institute of Classical Studies, University of London (PhD by publication, full time)

Primary supervisor

Available for doctoral supervision: Yes

Professional Affiliations

Professional affiliations:

Name Activity
Elected Fellow, Society of Antiquaries London (FSA)
Elected Fellow, Royal Historical Society (FRHistS)
Research Fellow, British School at Rome
Honorary Fellow, Macquarie University
Research Affiliate, Australian Archaeological Institute at Athens
Research Affiliate, Centre for Ancient Cultural Heritage and Environment, Macquarie University

Collaborations:

Name Type Activity Start date End date
Falerii Novi Project Research collaboration Large-scale fieldwork and research with the British School at Rome, Harvard University and University of Toronto 01-Jun-2021
Relevant Events

Other editing/publishing activities:

Date Details
Editorial Board: Bulletin for the Institute of Classical Studies, Oxford University Press

Reviewer: Journal of Late Antiquity, Johns Hopkins University Press

Reviewer: Annual of the British School at Athens, Cambridge University Press

Reviewer: Opuscula, Swedish Institutes at Rome and Athens

Reviewer: Open Archaeology, De Gruyter

Reviewer: European Review, Cambridge University Press

Reviewer: International Journal of Inclusive Education, Taylor & Francis

Reviewer: Dumbarton Oaks Papers, Harvard University Press

Reviewer: Antiquity, Cambridge University Press

Reviewer: Eos: Commentarii Societatis Philologae Polonorum, University of Wroclaw

Reviewer: Greek, Roman, and Byzantine Studies, Duke University Press

Reviewer: Edinburgh University Press

Reviewer: British Archaeological Reports Monograph Series

Panel Member: UKRI Interdisciplinary Assessment College

Assessing grant applications for UKRI Cross Research Council Responsive Mode Grants

Reviewer: Journal of Mediterranean Archaeology, Equinox Publishing

Editorial Board: Public Humanities, Cambridge University Press

Consultancy & Media
Available for consultancy:
Yes
Media experience:
Yes
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